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Whether you are a beginning motorcyclist or an experienced rider, you occasionally take a fall. Therefore, you will likely have a case of road rash at some point in your riding career, if you have not already. 

Road rash is a slang term for abrasion of the skin, that occurs specifically due to an accident on a city street or highway. In many cases, it is mild. However, according to Healthline, there are also severe cases of road rash, and these carry with them a risk of complications. 

Severity 

There are three grades of abrasion injuries. The third-degree abrasion is the most severe because it extends down through the superficial layer of the skin past the dermis, which is the deeper layer, down into the tissues underneath. These wounds can bleed profusely and carry a greater risk of complications. Another name for a third-degree abrasion is an avulsion injury. 

Complications 

Infection and scarring are the most likely complications of a third-degree road rash injury. You can reduce your risk of scarring by receiving treatment as soon as possible. You should watch for symptoms of infection, such as fever and foul-smelling wound discharge. You may observe yellow, green or brown pus from the wound, a painful lump in your armpit or groin or find that your skin is painful and irritated. An infected wound may not heal on its own, but your doctor will probably prescribe antibiotics to treat it. 

You can reduce your risk of scarring by not picking at the wound and your risk of infection by keeping the wound clean.